the experts

Brilliant post from Diary of a Mom

a diary of a mom

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{image is a screenshot of Bill and Ted from Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure}

Dr William Acton.

Ever heard of him?

He was quite renowned in his day (his day being the mid-nineteenth century.)

In 1836, at the age of 23, Dr. Acton moved to Paris where he studied the functions of the generative and urinary organs under the American-born Phillipe Ricord, ultimately deciding to concentrate on gynecology. By 27, when he returned to his native England, he was already recognized as a preeminent expert in the field. He became a member of the Royal College of Surgeons. He wrote a book. He practiced gynecology for seventeen years. He wrote another book. And then another.

In his 1857 tome,  The Functions and Disorders of the Reproductive Organs … he wrote, “The majority of women (happily for them) are not very much troubled with sexual feeling of any kind.”

He also wrote, “As…

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#autismspeaks10 and #actuallyautistic #autismchampions – part one

The recent attempt of actually Autistic people to be heard above (and in spite of) Autism Speak’s 10 year anniversary has been interesting, to say the least, and obviously not at all what they were expecting. Certain outlets of the media “attempted” to cover the story – including MTV, which I tried to comment on only to realize that the story had been pulled – with disheartening results. This article is reblogged from Jess (Diary of a Mom), one of the most intelligent and eloquent voices I’ve heard out there for Autism advocacy.

a diary of a mom

Screen shot 2015-03-01 at 8.39.02 AM

{image is a screen shot of a tweet: @autismspeaks On 2/25 Autism Speaks turns 10-years-old! Tell us how AS has touched your life at AS10Years@gmail.com #AutismSpeaks10}

Screen shot 2015-03-01 at 9.30.06 AM

{image is a screenshot of a tweet: @stevesilberman Autistic people have taken over the hashtag #AutismSpeaks10 to oppose negative messaging. It’s quite a thing.}

The past couple of weeks have been nothing if not colorful in the world of autism advocacy. It all began when, ahead of its 10th anniversary last Wednesday, Autism Speaks asked its 168,000 Twitter followers and 1.5 million Facebook fans to use the hashtag #AutismSpeaks10 to share “how AS has touched your life.” The response was, I would imagine, not quite what they were hoping it would be.

In an article detailing what happened next, Virginia Hughes, BuzzFeed Science Editor, wrote:

Instead of heartwarming stories of gratitude, the hashtag has sparked hundreds of angry missives from autistic people and…

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Interviewing Individuals with Aspergers Syndrome

Samantha Craft over at Everyday Aspergers has put together an excellent guide for anyone in a position to interview and hire people on the autism spectrum. It would also be useful for autists to review to help keep things in perspective and process the experience. I think it would be an excellent resource for autistic students just trying to enter the workforce, entering college, or interviewing for other types of positions.

Everyday Asperger's

1. When interviewing candidates-for-hire on the autistic spectrum, either remotely or face-to-face, individuals may appear as one of two extremes: 1) overly confident with an almost false persona or 2) extremely nervous and apologetic.
2. Rarely, during an interview, is a person with Aspergers/autism feeling at ease and content and able to present a comfortable version of self. This is not an attempt to fool or falsify self, but instead an effort to try to blend in and be part of the ‘norm.’ This is a result of a strong intrinsic desire to meet others’ expectations in order to fit in and avoid ridicule or miscommunication.
3. Without a rulebook or list of how to act in a specific role, in this case as interviewee, the candidate can present as anxious, tense, aloof, frightened and/or extremely nervous.
4. Partaking in an interview can cause extreme stress for days before the…

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The Little Professor is Compensating for Something: Theory of Mind and Pedantic Speech

Excellent post from The Artism Spectrum about why we over-explain.

The Artism Spectrum

“That woman is irritating,” Cara says.

“What?” I say. “Why?”

“She can’t separate herself from her own knowledge[.] […] She keeps saying things like they’re obvious when they are not, in fact, obvious.”

(—Veronica Roth, Allegiant)

pedantictwilightFULL Drawn w/ GIMP. Yes, it’s My Little Pony. Who better to illustrate pedantic speech than Twilight Sparkle?

The inspiration for today’s post comes from… a novel I’m reading, believe it or not. I’ve finally gotten around to reading Veronica Roth’s Divergent series this week, which my mother has been raving about for years. It’s actually been pretty great! It’s very Young Adult Fiction, so anyone not used to the genre will probably hate the writing style, but the story is gripping, and I’m loving the diversity and dimensionality of the characters. Plus, I have a soft spot for dystopian young adult scifi.   If you’re a Divergent fan, don’t worry; this post is…

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Theory finds that individuals with Asperger’s Syndrome don’t lack empathy – in fact if anything they empathize too much

As a child I was extremely “sensitive.” Everyone said so. It made me feel guilty and weak and rather stupid. I definitely grew up under the impression it was a Bad Thing and strove to distance myself from anything that overwhelmed me emotionally and avoided most situations that made me feel that way – except animals and especially horses. I’ll write about that at some point. This (reblogged) post is pretty spot-on. Original blog: http://seventhvoice.wordpress.com/

Seventh Voice

Art work by Aegis Mario S. Nevado Art work by Aegis Mario S. Nevado

“A ground-breaking theory suggests people with autism-spectrum disorders such as Asperger’s do not lack empathy – rather, they feel others’ emotions too intensely to cope.”

“People with Asperger’s syndrome, a high functioning form of autism, are often stereotyped as distant loners or robotic geeks. But what if what looks like coldness to the outside world is a response to being overwhelmed by emotion – an excess of empathy, not a lack of it?

This idea resonates with many people suffering from autism-spectrum disorders and their families. It also jibes with the “intense world” theory, a new way of thinking about the nature of autism.

As posited by Henry and Kamila Markram of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, the theory suggests that the fundamental problem in autism-spectrum disorders is not a social deficiency but, rather, a hypersensitivity to experience…

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