Again, I regret not posting here more often. I have so much I want to say but have felt mostly overwhelmed lately and unable to focus on posting, between one thing and another, and working to get my novels finished. A friend posted this on Facebook, and it’s brilliant, so I’d like to share it with you. It’s meaning is clear and goes so far beyond a difference of race or skin color.

Peace.

Aspergers – My feelings. (A page followers words by -Annie.)

Explaining HOW I feel is often as hard as explaining WHY I feel that way. A lot of the time I just don’t know. Sometimes it just takes too much emotional energy to try to figure it out and I have to block it out. When I was a child, I’d dissolve into tears, apparently for no reason, often in a corner, trying not to bother anyone, not wanting to be noticed. Everyone said I was “sensitive.” They mostly said I was” too sensitive.” So as I grew, became a teen, I learned to hold it in. Instead of tears, I’d shut down, block the world out. And that’s when I became aware of depression.

This is a great blog post by Beautiful Random Dark Thoughts of a Female Aspie and describes those feelings exactly.

Beautiful random dark thoughts of 3 autistic females

The trouble with autism/aspergers is that often we struggle to recognize emotions, often we outwardly display common signs, and will even wonder aloud, “why is everything so irritating? Why am I so on edge? I don’t know why I feel so irritable about everything, I can’t pinpoint a reason why, I have no patience for anything.” Not realizing the power of the emotional storm surging underneath. We become more aspie in a way, displaying flat emotional reactions, and even a perceived general disinterest in others, or even a feigned interest because that is all we ‘can’ do in that moment because anything else will send us over the edge. Stress, even over little things that may seem like nothing, is enough to shut us down completely. Verbally silent and unresponsive, it takes every effort just to mutter the words, “I can’t right now.” Feeling exhausted, yet charged with emotions, every…

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The Hidden Gender

I really like this poster so I’m sharing. I was (and am) all of these things, except the last. Home (until I married) was always a refuge. I saw this poster first on Facebook, but borrowed it from The Hidden Village of Aspergers. An autistic mom named L. Style created it. Thanks L!

Autism and girls descriptive poster

B B Shepherd is a musician, educator, and author and can also be found at Glistering: B’s Blog

Beyond The Talk: What Else Autistic Girls Need to Know About Puberty

Excellent post on some of the issues to be aware of with autistic girls approaching puberty. I could have related to all these things (and still do to many of them). I wish I’d understood myself better (my autism) and understood that the fact that I seemed to have so much more trouble and confusion than others around me seemed to have, especially where relationships (boys) were concerned.

Musings of an Aspie

This was originally posted at a group blog that I’m part of: We Are Like Your Child. It primarily addresses parents of young autistics, but I’m reposting here because I thought other autistic adults might have helpful tips to add or their own wishlist of things they’d known about puberty.

One request: if you talk about anything traumatic, please reference it obliquely. There are some younger readers here now and I could see others finding this post in a search for autism and puberty or adolescence.

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When it came to puberty, my parents did what many parents in the seventies did: they gave me a book about puberty written especially for girls. It was a slim cranberry hardback with an ambiguous title like “Everything is Changing.”

I was a voracious reader, so I would curl up in my beanbag and scour the pages for clues to the mysterious…

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#autismspeaks10 and #actuallyautistic #autismchampions – part one

The recent attempt of actually Autistic people to be heard above (and in spite of) Autism Speak’s 10 year anniversary has been interesting, to say the least, and obviously not at all what they were expecting. Certain outlets of the media “attempted” to cover the story – including MTV, which I tried to comment on only to realize that the story had been pulled – with disheartening results. This article is reblogged from Jess (Diary of a Mom), one of the most intelligent and eloquent voices I’ve heard out there for Autism advocacy.

Interviewing Individuals with Aspergers Syndrome

Samantha Craft over at Everyday Aspergers has put together an excellent guide for anyone in a position to interview and hire people on the autism spectrum. It would also be useful for autists to review to help keep things in perspective and process the experience. I think it would be an excellent resource for autistic students just trying to enter the workforce, entering college, or interviewing for other types of positions.

Everyday Asperger's

1. When interviewing candidates-for-hire on the autistic spectrum, either remotely or face-to-face, individuals may appear as one of two extremes: 1) overly confident with an almost false persona or 2) extremely nervous and apologetic.
2. Rarely, during an interview, is a person with Aspergers/autism feeling at ease and content and able to present a comfortable version of self. This is not an attempt to fool or falsify self, but instead an effort to try to blend in and be part of the ‘norm.’ This is a result of a strong intrinsic desire to meet others’ expectations in order to fit in and avoid ridicule or miscommunication.
3. Without a rulebook or list of how to act in a specific role, in this case as interviewee, the candidate can present as anxious, tense, aloof, frightened and/or extremely nervous.
4. Partaking in an interview can cause extreme stress for days before the…

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The Little Professor is Compensating for Something: Theory of Mind and Pedantic Speech

Excellent post from The Artism Spectrum about why we over-explain.

The Artism Spectrum

“That woman is irritating,” Cara says.

“What?” I say. “Why?”

“She can’t separate herself from her own knowledge[.] […] She keeps saying things like they’re obvious when they are not, in fact, obvious.”

(—Veronica Roth, Allegiant)

pedantictwilightFULL Drawn w/ GIMP. Yes, it’s My Little Pony. Who better to illustrate pedantic speech than Twilight Sparkle?

The inspiration for today’s post comes from… a novel I’m reading, believe it or not. I’ve finally gotten around to reading Veronica Roth’s Divergent series this week, which my mother has been raving about for years. It’s actually been pretty great! It’s very Young Adult Fiction, so anyone not used to the genre will probably hate the writing style, but the story is gripping, and I’m loving the diversity and dimensionality of the characters. Plus, I have a soft spot for dystopian young adult scifi.   If you’re a Divergent fan, don’t worry; this post is…

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